Jacob Kresel (right), senior park ranger and natural resource specialist, and Cole Van Beusekom (left), park ranger, are easy to recognize with their forest green uniforms, “Smokey bear” hats and Corps castle belt buckles. The opportunity to work at the Chena Project in North Pole is a fulfilling vocation for both.
Corps park rangers share passion for outdoors, flood mitigation
Much like the Chena River snaking through the heart of downtown Fairbanks, a passion for the outdoors flows through the veins of the park rangers at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Alaska District’s Chena River Lakes Flood Control Project. The two are contributing members of a team overseeing 20,000 acres of multipurpose public land.
Brig. Gen. Jeffrey Milhorn, deputy commanding general-support for Joint Task Force 505 during Operation Sahyogi Haat and commanding general of the Pacific Ocean Division, visited the Corps-built water well located at the Nepal Armed Police Force Headquarters in Halchowk, Kathmandu. Milhorn observed that the well survived the earthquake with minor repairs and provided water for more than 5,000 displaced citizens. The district managed the $1.3 million installation of seven wells, which range from 500 feet to 1,000 feet deep. Each one is complete with more than 6,500 gallons of water storage capacity, filtration system and emergency generator. Located throughout Kathmandu, each well can provide potable water for up to 15,000 people following a disaster event.
Humanitarian assistance projects provide disaster relief in Nepal
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) recently completed two humanitarian assistance construction projects that are now providing critical support services to the population of Kathmandu, Nepal, in the wake of the deadly earthquakes that struck in April and May.
Doug Bliss, chief of the Geotechnical and Engineering Services Branch, is continuing a career that has circumnavigated the world. After spending more than two decades in the Republic of Korea, he is following his professional and personal pursuits at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Alaska District.
Corps employee brings decades of experience from South Korea to Alaska
From Los Angeles to Anchorage with international stops in between, this new district employee brings seasoned engineering expertise from around the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and private industry.
Since 2009, more than 7,800 tons of contaminated soil polluted the remote location of Test Well No. 9 near Umiat, a historic oil exploratory base camp. The conditions are harsh with the site located more than 100 miles from the nearest road system in the National Petroleum Reserve – Alaska. Several long trains of snow-tracked machinery transported the material to the disposal staging area.
Arctic Cleanup: Tough conditions no match for test well remediation
Since 2009, more than 7,800 tons of contaminated soil polluted the remote location of Test Well No. 9 near Umiat, a historic oil exploratory base camp. The conditions are harsh with the site located more than 100 miles from the nearest road system in the National Petroleum Reserve – Alaska. Several long trains of snow-tracked machinery transported the material to the disposal staging area.

Alaska District Photos