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Tag: USACE Alaska District
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  • April

    National Guard armories find new purpose on Last Frontier

    Across the vast state of Alaska, small parcels of federal land host buildings used by the Alaska Army National Guard after World War II and during the Cold War. Now that these properties are no longer needed by the military, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Alaska District is working to transfer the land and associated improvements to local communities, which in many instances are native villages in critical need of additional housing and community facilities.
  • November

    Sitka woman finds STEM career with Army engineers

    Everyone pursues a career in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) for a different reason. Danielle Perkins, Department of the Army apprentice at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Alaska District, followed the footsteps of her dad and grandpas into that sector.
  • September

    Engineers tackle Army Combat Fitness Test in Alaska

    Soldiers with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Alaska District partnered with the 6th Brigade Engineer Battalion to assess their strength and stamina during the Army Combat Fitness Test on Aug. 17 at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska.
  • August

    Army engineers teach 125 students about STEM in Alaska

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Alaska District hosted 125 students from the Fairbanks community for STEM activities on Aug. 5 at the Chena River Lakes Flood Control Project near North Pole, Alaska.
  • July

    Engineers help to improve educational opportunities in Mongolia

    In a country experiencing a shortage of critical educational facilities, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Alaska District is overseeing the design and construction of kindergartens to better the lives of children in Mongolia. Over the last three years, the district has partnered with the U.S. Embassy and U.S. Indo-Pacific Command to improve educational opportunities for more than 300 students throughout Mongolia.
  • May

    Alaska District commander embraces heritage, promotes diversity

    Walking into the headquarters building for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Alaska District, a wall of portraits featuring former commanders greets employees and visitors alike. Of the 29 men who have led the organization during its distinguished history, Col. Damon Delarosa is the first to represent the Asian American community.
  • March

    General visits northernmost USACE-run flood control project

    Maj. Gen. William H. Graham, deputy commanding general of civil and emergency operations for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, visited the Moose Creek Dam on Feb. 19 while touring the organization’s northernmost flood control project. Col. Kirk Gibbs, USACE Pacific Ocean Division commander, and Col. Damon Delarosa, USACE Alaska District commander, accompanied the general.
  • December

    Corps moves into 22nd year of cleanup on tribal land in Southeast Alaska

    Nestled 20 miles south of Ketchikan, Alaska, the Metlakatla Indian Community resides on Annette Island.  The tribe opted out of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act when Congress passed the legislation in 1971.  Today the Annette Islands Reserve is the only Native American reservation in the state and the tribe lives among the remnants of past military and federal use of the land. Through the Native American Lands Environmental Mitigation Program, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Alaska District and the Metlakatla Indian Community are working together to continue environmental cleanup efforts for the 22nd year.
  • October

    Corps project helps improve Soldiers’ sleep

    Almost every night, people close their curtains to go to sleep; but for Soldiers stationed in the Fairbanks area, regular curtains will not suffice. Getting quality sleep in the middle of summer, when daylight is nearly 24 hours a day, is a challenge that can adversely affect mental health. U.S. Army Garrison Alaska is taking a multifaceted approach to address this problem and a small but effective piece of this work is by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Alaska District. They worked with Fort Wainwright and Fort Greely to install 2,740 blackout shades in 30 barracks this year to improve sleep quality and in turn, enhance the mental health and well-being of Alaska’s warfighters.
  • July

    Alaska District breathes new life into 1940’s-era headquarters building

    In 1979, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Alaska District added 37,800 square feet of dark brown, steel siding and trim to its headquarters and laboratory buildings located on what is now known as Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson. Since then, the organization has grown to more than 400 employees and implemented projects across Alaska and the Indo-Pacific Region. But, during nearly half of the district’s history, the exterior of the facility stayed the same color, weathering storms and harsh Alaskan winters each year.