News Stories

  • July

    All-Army triathlete’s skills founded in preparation

    Underneath his quiet and cool demeanor, 1st Lt. Marcus Farris is ready to be unleashed on race days. A disciplined athlete, he has trained for many hours to represent and compete as a member of the All-Army Triathlon team.
  • June

    Corps park rangers share passion for outdoors, flood mitigation

    Jacob Kresel, senior park ranger and natural resource specialist, and Cole Van Beusekom, park ranger, are easy to recognize with their forest green uniforms, “Smokey bear” hats and Corps castle belt buckles. The opportunity to work at the Chena Project in North Pole is a fulfilling vocation for both.
  • Humanitarian assistance projects provide disaster relief in Nepal

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) recently completed two humanitarian assistance construction projects that are now providing critical support services to the population of Kathmandu, Nepal, in the wake of the deadly earthquakes that struck in April and May.
  • Corps employee brings decades of experience from South Korea to Alaska

    From Los Angeles to Anchorage with international stops in between, this new district employee brings seasoned engineering expertise from around the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and private industry.
  • May

    Arctic Cleanup: Tough conditions no match for test well remediation

    Since 2009, more than 7,800 tons of contaminated soil polluted the remote location of Test Well No. 9 near Umiat, a historic oil exploratory base camp. The conditions are harsh with the site located more than 100 miles from the nearest road system in the National Petroleum Reserve – Alaska. Operations at the site officially completed this year.
  • April

    Corps employee saves canine from watery demise

    Scooby, a boxer-breed dog, fell through thawing ice on the Eagle River April 18 near Anchorage leading her frantic owner to call for help. Luckily, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Alaska District employee Mike MacMillan, project manager in the Humanitarian Assistance Program, was home to answer the call from his neighbor in distress.
  • July

    Proven technology remains viable disaster communication tool

    High-frequency radio has withstood the historical evolution of telecommunications and remains a relevant means to transmit information over long distances. The mode is used by emergency management organizations and amateur enthusiasts, also known as ham operators. Therefore, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Alaska District is currently upgrading its capabilities with a new antenna.
  • June

    Former district commander visits old stomping grounds

    Retired Col. Amos Mathews is one of 26 soldiers to have served as the Alaska District commander during the 68-year history of the organization. His image is displayed among a group of leaders that are now pillars of Corps engineering history in Alaska. An ecstatic Col. Christopher Lestochi, the current district commander, hosted Mathews during a visit to the headquarters building at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson June 9.
  • May

    Corps promotes wetlands awareness to elementary students

    Hands were thrown upward toward the classroom ceiling when sixth-grade students answered whether they have visited Potter Marsh, Connors Bog or took a trip on the Tony Knowles Coastal Trail. These public recreational sites are either adjacent to waters of the United States or are local wetlands within the jurisdiction of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Alaska District’s regulatory program.
  • April

    Knack for negotiating leads Soldier to military contracting

    If speeding tickets kindled his Army career, then an act of generosity provided the spark. For a 20-year-old young man from Suffolk, Va., this was the case when his father’s best friend paid the traffic citations barring him from serving his country.